SEQUENCES IX



REALLY 

OCTOBER 11th - 20th



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ÍSLENSKA



Sequences real time art festival is an artist run biennial held in Reykjavík, Iceland. The aim of the festival is to produce and present progressive visual art. Founding members of and responsible for Sequences are Kling & Bang galleri (est. 2003), the Living Art Museum (est. 1978) and the Icelandic Art Center. Sequences is a non-profit organisation.


SEQUENCES
c/o Icelandic Art Center

Gimli, Laekjargata 3
101 Reykjavik
Iceland


00354 5627262
sequences@sequences.is     



︎

Mark

18.10.19


Philip Jeck at Fríkirkjan in Reykjavík



Recording from Jeck’s performance at the Boiler Room in 2015


Tonight we offer the rare opportunity to see Philip Jeck perform at Fríkirkjan in Reykjavík as a part of Sequences IX - Really
Order your ticket here or come by Fríkirkjan promptly before 8pm tonight on this beautiful fall day.

English artist Philip Jeck has for decades used sound as a foundation for his art. In Jeck’s work there is a deep sense of the world that once was; old record players and tired vinyls, often dug up out of antique shops, are the source of expressive and seductive sounds, full of breaks and debris, memories and desires.

Jeck has released numerous acclaimed albums with the British publishing company TOUCH, performed at concerts and art festivals around the world, and created sound installations for respected art spaces and festivals such as Hayward Gallery, Hamburger Bahnhof and the Biennale in Liverpool. Jeck has composed music for operas, ballets and films, and has worked with musicians such as Gavin Bryars, Jah Wobble (from Public Image Ltd), Jaki Liebezeit (from CAN), Jacob Kirkegaard, Jóhann Jóhannsson and Hildur Guðnadóttir.

One of Philip Jeck's best-known works is undoubtedly Vinyl Requiem for 180 old Dansette record players, co-produced with artist Lol Sargent, premiered in Union Chapel in London in 1993.


Mark